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Panel – 20 Years In The Making: Independent Latin Canadian Cinema

June 2, 2016 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

| Free

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alucine poster 1997

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Thursday, June 2 | 6:00pm – 8:00pm | 12 Clinton St | FREE EVENT

“To be Latino is thus somewhat like directing a loquacious orchestra without a score, to undergo a seemingly endless negotiation of identity and difference from both inside and outside a multifaceted prism, and to be involved in a constant search for an inter- and intra-community common ground.” – Elena Feder
The issues and ideas discussed at the panel will cover all aspects of the diasporic experience of the Americas; Echoing the film screenings in which Latin filmmakers works exhibit different foci and degrees of concern with border-crossing issues and post-national diasporic identity formations.
In reflecting on the history of Latin Canadian filmmaking, the panel aims to conceptualize what evolutionary framework is needed to support independent Latino-Canadian filmmakers in the future.The on-going need for spaces for culturally specific media arts exhibition and the relevance of such spaces to future generations of independent Latino-Canadian filmmakers is being questioned, and it is this questioning that serves as the starting point for the panelists’ discussion.


Panelists include notable Latino-Canadian media artists and programmers such as Ricardo Acosta, Eva-Lynn Jagoe, Jorge Lozano, Alejandro Ronceria, and Sinara Rozo.
With this special program we aim to showcase the achievements and talent of our filmmakers and their integral role in the artistic identity of the Canadian cultural panorama.

Panelists

Ricardo Acosta Ricardo Acosta immigrated to Canada from his native Cuba in 1993.  Before coming to Toronto, he studied and worked with the world renowned Cuban Film Institute in Havana.  For the past twelve years Ricardo has edited both documentary and dramatic films, which have been shown around the world. His outstanding work has contributed to the making of several award-winning films including: Shooting Indians, A Journey With Jeffrey Thomas directed by Ali Kazimi (Genie Award nomination for Best Short Documentary); Unbound directed by Claudia Morgado (Berlin Film Festival Award for Best Short Film); Spirits of Havana produced by the NFB (Genie Award nomination for Best Documentary); The Take directed by Naomi Klein and Avi Lewis (Gemini nomination for The Donald Brittain Award for Best Social/Political Documentary Program & for Best Picture Editing in a Documentary Program or Series); and Runaway Groom directed by Ali Kazimi (Gemini Donald Brittain Award for Best Social/Political Documentary Program). Ricardo was chosen to be a fellow by the Sundance Institute in 2006 for the Documentary Film Editing and Story Laboratory. Herman’s House, from Toronto’s Storyline Entertainment, edited by Ricardo Acosta won Documentary Emmy in the outstanding arts and culture programming category.
ELG5_ Eva-Lynn Jagoe is an Associate Professor of Latin American Cinema and Culture and Comparative Literature at University of Toronto. She teaches experimental critical writing, feminism, and Argentine and Mexican culture. Her book, The End of the World as They Knew It: Writing Experiences of the Argentine South, examines representations of the South in Argentine and English texts from the nineteenth century to the present, arguing that the narration of this space is formative in the shaping of a collective memory and history of Argentina. She is currently writing a book entitled Take Her, She’s Yours.” a series of lyric essays on gender and sexuality. She has published in journals such as Reviews in Cultural Theory, Cinemascope, Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies, Revista Canadiense de Estudios Hispánicos and Revista Hispánica Moderna. evalynnjagoe.com
Jorge Loazno Jorge Lozano has been working as a film and video artist for the last 20 years and has achieved national and international recognition. His work has been exhibited at the Toronto Film Festival, at the Sundance Film Festival, and The Images Festival amongst others.  He has expanded his practice to the production of improvised sound work, the organization of cultural events and the facilitation of self-representations video workshops for marginalized Latin and non-Latin youth in Canada since 1991 Venezuela 2005 and Colombia 2005-2009.
alejo photo Alejandro Ronceria is an internationally acclaimed and award-winning director, choreographer, producer based in Canada with an extensive and illustrious career in multiple artistic disciplines. He has created and produced large – scale productions nationally and internationally, including the United States, Mexico, New Zealand and Colombia.Most recently, he was a Director/Choreographer for Almalgama, a new work commissioned by the City of Toronto for TORONTO 2015 Pan Am Games. As well, he also served as Director / Co-Producer of the Opening Night Showcase for the Aboriginal Pavilion held during the TORONTO 2015 Pan Am Games. Notably, Alejandro choreographed a segment of the Welcome from the Aboriginal Peoples of Canada for the opening ceremony of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. The spectacular live event was aired on ten international broadcast channels in a total of 11 languages. It was the most watched Canadian television event in history with 23 million viewers. In the USA, there were 32.6 million viewers, thus the second-most watched non-American Winter Olympics and 3.5 billion viewers worldwide. Alejandro is the co-founder/founding artistic director of the first Aboriginal Dance Program in North America at The Banff Center for the Arts. The groundbreaking program brought together diverse Aboriginal/Inuit dancers from Canada, the USA, Mexico and Greenland. From 1996-2001, he served as the artistic director. This program was the incubator for developing a new generation of choreographers working in Canada and abroad and served as a model for various schools for indigenous dance internationally. One of the productions from the Banff program grew into Bones: The first Aboriginal Dance Opera (2001), collaboration with Sadie Buck and choreographed by him. Alejandro was one of the pioneers of dancefilm as a unique medium in Canada. In 1996, his dancefilm “A Hunter Called Memory” was an official selection at the Toronto International Film Festival, Sundance Film Festival, Clermont – Ferrand and Sheffield. In 2004, he was nominated for a Dora Mayor Award for Best Choreography for “The Art Show”. He has since been awarded numerous Canada Council for the Arts awards and served on juries for dance. In 2010, Alejandro was the first recipient to graduate with a Masters Degree in Fine Arts from York University in Dance Dramaturgy and the first to hold this degree from a Canadian university.

 

Co-presented by Latin American Studies at U of T:
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Details

Date:
June 2, 2016
Time:
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Cost:
Free
Event Categories:
,

Organizer

aluCine Latin Film+Media Arts Festival
Phone:
416-548-8914
Website:
alucinefestival.com

Venue

Monarch Tavern
12 Clinton St.
Toronto, Ontario Canada
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